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Ootul, a town situated on the eastern side of the valley, which ranks next in importance, scarcely a fourth ; Layaree, Oot, Momadary, and the others, are small villages of thirty or forty houses each, part built of mud, and the rest of mats, and none have more than 150 or 200 inhabitants. The people generally are scattered over the face of the country, and have no fixed habitations ; their huts are erected whereever there is pasturage for their cattle, and being constructed of stakes and reed mats, are easily removed to other spots when the supply of fodder is exhausted. Beylah, the capital, is built upon a rising ground on the north bank of a small river flowing from the mountains to th north-east, which joins the Poorally about a mile to the westwardo the city. It contains about 800 houses built of mud, and a population about 5000 souls. The palace of the Jam is situated in the north east quarter, and this part of it is surrounded by a mud wall of great strength, which is the only defence of the place.

The productions of Lus, are grain, (chiefly wheat, and jowaree) seed, a kind of gram called gogur, and cotton ; ghee is made in lar quantities, and sent to Kurachee or Soonmemy for exportation, a the flocks furnish a small supply of wool :-cotton cloth, with coarse woollen dresses worn by the peasantry, and coarse carpets ma at Beylah, are the only articles manufactured in the country.

It is difficult to form an estimate of the amount of the populat from the people being so much scattered over the face of the coun but I do not think it exceeds 25,000 souls. It is composed princip of Noomrees, descendants from the ancient Summa and Soonvia I poots, whose chiefs formerly ruled in Sinde, and who are divided seven tribes—the Jamootry, Arab Gudoor, Shooroo, Boorah, Sh Warah, and Mungayah. The Arab Gudoor is said to be a bra from the celebrated Arab tribe the Koreish, and to have settle Lus in the reign of the third caliph Omar. That the family of Oosmanany, the chief, is from an Arab stock is evident, for in him all his relatives the Arab form and features are strongly marked the resemblance is not visible in the tribe generally, and it is no of Noomree origin. The Jokeeas, and Jukreeas, who are also N rees, and inhabit the mountainous country to the eastward, wer formerly subject to the chief of Lus; but when Kurachee was talthe Scindians they threw off their allegiance, and have ever acknowledged the authority of the Ameers. Besides Noomrees the also many Hindoos, and a large number of African slaves : the perform all the work. The chiefs and a few of their military fol are robust, and good looking men, but the Noomrees generally poss of those qualities, either physical or moral, which would entitle t

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Total,

2,700 Since the death of the Jam's father, who expired about eight year ago, the revenues of the province have decreased considerably, an do not now amount to more than 35,000 Rupees annually. They a derived from a duty of three per cent. levied on all imports ac exports, and a bazar toll of one per cent. collected at the towns th bave to pass through on the road to Beylah. There is also a land tax one-third the produce on all grounds irrigated from the rivers, and o fifth on those which depend solely upon the rain for a supply of wa Last year the revenue collected at the different towns was as follow At Soonmemy,

Rupees, 12,000
At Layaree,

2,000
At Ootul,

3,000 At Beylah,

9,000 At Oomarah,

1,000 Land tax,

8,000

Total,

35,000 Soonmemy is the principal sea-port of Lus, and for such a mise looking place possesses considerable trade. The town generally Meany by the natives is mean and dirty, and does not contain than 500 houses ; they are built of sticks and mud, and have a turret rising above the roof open to the sea breeze, without which would scarcely be habitable in the summer months, on account excessive heat ; formerly the town was surrounded by a mud but as no pains were taken to keep it in repair it gradually decay, and now scarcely a vestige of it remains. It contains a lation of about 2,000 souls, most of whom are employed in fishin are extremely poor, and there are besides a few Hindoos who ha whole trade of the place in their hands. At Meany the water tremely bad. I examined all the wells in the neighbourhoo caused others to be dug in the most promising spots, but it brackish that it was not drinkable, and I was obliged to

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