صور الصفحة
PDF
النشر الإلكتروني

aye bent

L.

Your honey sweet shall mixéd be with gall,

LII. Your short delight shall end with pain and Gif Christ be gain, although ye seem to grief;

flee Yet trust in God, for His assistance call, With golden wings above the firmament ; And He shall help and send you some relief Come down again, ye shall not better be,

That pride of yours ye shall right sore XLIX.

repent : Though waters great do compass you Then hold Him fast, with humble heart

about, Though tyrants fret, though lions rage To follow Him, although through Hell and roar ;

and Death; Defy them all, and fear not to win out, He went before, his soul was torn and rent, Your guide is near to help you ever more. For your deserts He felt His father's wrath. Though prick of iron do prick you wondrous sore,

LIII. As noisome lusts that seek your soul to

Though in the end ye suffer torments fell, slay ;

Clim'fast to Him, that felt the same before; Yet cry on Christ, and He shall go before,

The way to Heaven mon be through The nearer Heaven the harder is the way.

Death and Hell ;
The last assault will trouble you full sore;

The lion then maist cruelly will roar, Run out your race, ye mon not faint nor His time is short, his forces he will bend, tire,

The greater strife the greater is your glore, Nor sit, nor stand, nor turn (you) back Your pain is short your joy shall never end. again ;

LIV. Gif ye design to have your heart's desire Press forward still, although it be with Rejoice in God, let not your courage fail,

Ye chosen saints that are afflicted here ; pain : No rest for you so long as ye remain

Though Sathan rage, he never shall prevail,

Fecht to the end, and stoutly persevere, Ane pilgrim poor, into thy loathsome life : Fecht on your faucht,' it shall not be in

Your God is true, your blood is to Him

dear; vain, Your rich reward is worth ane greater

Fear not the way, since Christ is your strife.

convoy,

When clouds are past, the weather will LI. Gif after tears ye live ane while in joy,

Ye sow in tears but ye shall reap in joy. And get ane taste of that eternal glore, Be not secure, nor slip not your convoy,

LV. For gif ye do ye shall repent it sore : Both Death and Hell has lost their cruel He knows the way, and He mon go before: sting, Climb yé alone ye shall not miss ane fall; Your Captain Christ has made them all Your humbled flesh it mon be troubled to yield; more,

Lift up your hearts and praises to Him Gif ye forget upon your guide to call.

sing,

[ocr errors]

grow clear

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

crown.

Triumph for joy your enemies are killed ;

LVIII. The Lord of Hosts, that is your strength The joy of Heaven is worth ane moment's and shield,

pain ; The Serpent's head has stoutly tramped Take courage, then, lift up your hearts on down,

high ; Trust in His strength, pass fordwart in To judge the earth when Christ shall the field,

come again, Overcome in fecht, and ye shall wear the Above the clouds ye shall exalted be:

The throne of joy and true felicity

Await for you, when finished is your fecht; LVI.

Suffer ane while, and ye shall shortly see The King of kings, gif He be on our side, Aneglore maist great and infinite of wecht." We need not fear what dare against us

stand; Into the field may we not boldly bide,

Prepare yourselves, be valiant men of weir, 2 When He shall help us with his mighty And thrust with force out through the hand,

narrow way; Who sits above and rules both sea and

Hold on thy course and shrink not back land,

for fear, Who with His breath doth make the hills Christ is your guide, ye shall not go astray ; to shake :

The time is near, be sober, watch and pray; The hosts of heaven are armed at his He sees your tears, and He has laid in

command To fight the field, when we appear most Ane rich reward, whilk in that joyful day wake. 2

Ye shall receive, and ring for evermore.

LIX.

store

and sea,

3

LVII.

LX. Pluck up your heart, ye are not left alone, Now to the King that create all of nought, The Lamb of God shall lead you in the And Lord of lords, that rules both land

way ; The Lord of Hosts that rings 3 on royal | That saved our souls, and with his blood throne,

us bought, Against your foes your banner will display: And vanquished Death triumphant on the The angels bright shall stand in good tree, array

Unto the great and glorious Trinity To hold you up, ye need not fear to That saves the poor and does his ain fall;

defend; Your enemies shall flie and be your prey, Be laud and gloir, honour and majesty, Ye shall triumph, and they shall perish Power and praise, Amen, world without all.

end.

"Against.

2 Weak.

3 Reigns

1 Weight, importance.

2 Men of war.

SIR ROBERT AYTOUN,

1570-1638.

are

Sir Robert AYTOUN is reckoned the became private secretary to the queen first Scotchman who, after the diver- of Charles I. gence of English and Scotch into dif- His eminence as a scholar, and his ferent dialects, wrote correct English elegance as a poet, brought him into in the style to which the language contact with most of the literary men attained through the powerful trans- of his time ; while with Ben Jonson, and

; forming genius of the writers of the Hobbes of Malmsbury, he was on terms Elizabethan period.

of intimate friendship. In his conver. The Aytouns of Scotland sations with Drummond of Hawthorne descended from Gilbert De Vescy, who den, he was almost the only one of received the lands of Aytoun, in his acquaintances of whom Ben spoke Berwickshire, from King Robert Bruce, in an affectionate manner, for he says, and thence they derive their surname. Aytoun loved him dearly!” No

Sir Robert was the second son of further particulars are known of his life, Andrew Aytoun, of Kinaldie in Fife- but his monument in Westminster shire, and was born there in 1570. He | Abbey, erected by his nephew, Sir John entered St Andrews University in 1584, Aytoun, knight of the Black Rod, rewhere he studied for four years, and cords his having died unmarried, in the took his degree of M.A. He after- palace of Whitehall, in March 1638, in wards proceeded to Paris, as is sup- his 68th year. posed, to study law, and distinguished Aytoun's poems are not numerous, himself as a Greek and Latin scholar. nor of sustained effort, but they show Returning to Britain in 1603, he much perfection in the art of poetry, wrote a Latin address on the acces. and a Horation elegance of style and sion of James VI. to the English throne, turn of thought becoming their semiwhich attracted the King's notice, and lyrical character. He himself possibly led to the poet's appointment as a gen placed more value upon his Latin tleman of the bed-chamber, private Poems, which appeared in the Delitiae secretary to the Queen, and a privy Poetarum Scotorum, than

his councillor. James, in 1609, employed English Poems, for they appeared in him as his ambassador to present copies all sorts of ways, scattered here and of his “ Apology for the Oath of Al. there, and were only first collected in legiance” to the courts of Germany ; | 1844, on the occasion of a man

nanuscript and in connection with this mission, it is copy having come into the hands of Dr supposed, he received the honour of Charles Rogers, who had them printed knighthood. After James' death, he for private circulation. In Aubrey's

on

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

none.

Yet do thou glory in thy choice

Thy choice, of his good fortune boast ; I'll neither grieve, nor yet rejoice,

To see him gain what I have lost.

SIR ROBERT AYTOUN,

1570—1638.

are

Sir Robert AYTOUN is reckoned the became private secretary to the queen first Scotchman who, after the diver- of Charles I. gence of English and Scotch into dif- His eminence as a scholar, and his ferent dialects, wrote correct English elegance as a poet, brought him into in the style to which the language contact with most of the literary men attained through the powerful trans- of his time; while with Ben Jonson, and forming genius of the writers of the Hobbes of Malmsbury, he was on terms Elizabethan period.

of intimate friendship. In his converThe Aytouns of Scotland sations with Drummond of Hawthorn. descended from Gilbert De Vescy, who den, he was almost the only one of received the lands of Aytoun, in his acquaintances of whom Ben spoke Berwickshire, from King Robert Bruce, in an affectionate manner, for he says, and thence they derive their surname. Aytoun loved him dearly ! ” No

Sir Robert was the second son of further particulars are known of his life, Andrew Aytoun, of Kinaldie in Fise but his monument in Westminster shire, and was born there in 1570. He Abbey, erected by his nephew, Sir John entered St Andrews University in 1584, Aytoun, knight of the Black Rod, rewhere he studied for four years, and cords his having died unmarried, in the took his degree of M.A. He after- palace of Whitehall, in March 1638, in wards proceeded to Paris, as is sup- his 68th year. posed, to study law, and distinguished Aytoun's poems are not numerous, himself as a Greek and Latin scholar. nor of sustained effort, but they show Returning to Britain in 1603, he much perfection in the art of poetry, wrote a Latin address on the acces. and a Horation elegance of style and sion of James VI. to the English throne, turn of thought becoming their semiwhich attracted the King's notice, and lyrical character. He himself possibly led to the poet's appointment as a gen- placed more value upon his Latin tleman of the bed-chamber, private Poems, which appeared in the Delitiae secretary to the Queen, and a privy Poetarum Scotorum, than his councillor. James, in 1609, employed English Poems, for they appeared in him as his ambassador to present copies all sorts of ways, scattered here and of his “ Apology for the Oath of Al. there, and were only first collected in legiance” to the courts of Germany ; | 1844, on the occasion of a manuscript and in connection with this mission, it is copy having come into the hands of Dr supposed, he received the honour of Charles Rogers, who had them printed knighthood. After James' death, he for private circulation. In Aubrey's

on

« السابقةمتابعة »