Once in Golconda: A True Drama of Wall Street, 1920-1938

الغلاف الأمامي
John Wiley & Sons, 1997 - 307 من الصفحات
This classic of the bullish 1920s on Wall Street, the 1929 crash and its aftershocks, and the fall of the impeccable president of the New York Stock Exchange, Richard Whitney, offers an education for the contemporary investor. From the corrupt dealings that led to the securities laws governing the modern markets to the one-sided psychology of the bullish investor, John Brooks explores timeless themes as true today as when Once in Golconda was originally published a generation ago. Once in Golconda is the story of winners and losers. It begins with the famous, still unsolved, 1920 bomb explosion outside the Morgan bank and ends with a metaphoric explosion in the fall of Richard Whitney. The book gives a ringside seat for a succession of dramatic performances and actors: the "corner" in Stutz stock, engineered by Allan Ryan, dissident son of Thomas Fortune Ryan; the House of Morgan and, just across the street, Kuhn, Loeb & Company; the Irish (Joseph P. Kennedy, master manipulator of "pools"; Michael J. Meehan; Sell 'em Ben Smith); vignettes of the crash; and FDR's advisors playing with the price of gold.
 

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المحتويات

The Outrage
1
Ticker Tyranny
21
The Almost Aristocracy
41
So Near the Apes
65
Things Fall Apart
86
Enter the White Knight
115
Gold Standard on the Booze
148
Ordeal in Washington
180
The White Knight Unhorsed
210
Rising Action
230
Catastrophe
249
Denouement
270
Acknowledgments
288
Sources
289
Index
299
حقوق النشر

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عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

حول المؤلف (1997)

John Nixon Brooks was born on December 5, 1920, in New York City. He grew up in Trenton, New Jersey, and graduated from Princeton University in 1942. He was in the Unites States Army Air Forces immediately following his graduation, until 1945. Brooks went to work for Time magazine, where he became a contributing editor. In 1949, he joined The New Yorker as a staff writer. At the magazine, he wrote many articles and profiles about well-known business figures of the day. These profiles included Henry Ford II, Louis Rukeyser, Robert Moses, Arthur Laffer and Richard Whitney. Brooks authored three novels, of which, The Big Wheel, published in 1949, was most notable. It described a newsmagazine similar to Time. He also published ten non-fiction books on business and finance. His best-known books were Once in Golconda: A True Drama of Wall Street, 1920-1938, about the scandal surrounding Wall Street banker Richard Whitney; The Go-Go Years, which was about Wall Street in the 1960s; and The Takeover Game about the merger mania of the 1980s. In his later years, Brooks's writing on finance won him three Gerald Loeb Awards. He also served as vice president of PEN for four years, a vice president of the Society of American Historians and a trustee of the New York Public Library from 1978 until 1993. Brooks died on July 27, 1993, in East Hampton, New York, from complications of a stroke. His title Business Adventures was reprinted in 2014, after it had been featured in a Wall Street Journal article as Bill Gates's favorite business book.

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